AWANA FAQ's

What is AWANA?

For nearly 60 years, Awana has been a leader in children’s ministry, helping churches and parents worldwide raise children and youth to know, love and serve Christ.
Based in the Chicago area, Awana is the only organization with fully integrated evangelism and discipleship programs for ages 2-18 that actively involve parents, church leaders and mentors. Each week, more than a million children and youth, 250,000 volunteers and 300- plus field staff take part in Awana in over 17,000 churches in the U.S. and internationally.
Awana works with churches from nearly 100 different denominations. It began as a children’s program at the North Side Gospel Center in Chicago in 1941. Lance Latham, North Side’s senior pastor, collaborated with the church’s youth director, Arth Rorheim, to develop weekly clubs that would appeal to churched and unchurched kids, lead them to trust Christ for salvation and grow them in enduring faith and service to God.
Other churches learned about the success of the program and inquired about its availability. In 1950, Latham and Rorheim founded Awana as a parachurch organization. By 1960, 900 churches had started Awana programs. By 1972 Awana had begun its first international club. Today, children and youth in more than 100 countries participate in Awana programs, and millions of adults are alumni.
The founders of Awana derived the Awana name from the first letters of Approved Workmen Are Not Ashamed as taken from 2 Timothy 2:15 of the Bible.

 

How is our AWANA structured?

Each night of Awana is made up of three equally important segments:

  • Handbook Time
  • Council Time
  • Game Time

In Handbook time clubbers share the sections of their handbooks they have memorized since the previous club meeting. They will be in small groups or singly saying their sections and verses to a “listener”.
During Council Time clubbers learn Bible stories and hear a presentation of the Gospel.
Game Time allows the clubbers to play organized games, learning discipline values, team cooperation, and good sportsmanship.
Parents are always welcome to come and observe their child at Awana.

 

General Rules

Children are expected to:

  • Be on time.
  • Be in uniform.
  • Bring Handbook, Bible and dues ($0.50 per week).
  • Come prepared to say verses or sections from their handbook.
  • Say all section parts, in one continuous recitation, word perfect. (For example, if a section requires recitation of two verses, both verses must be recited from memory without stopping to study the second verse.)
  • Only two helps per section. Helps consist of three words or less.
  • Children may say from two (2) to five (5) sections per night.
  • Clubbers must wear tennis or athletic shoes and socks. Bare feet or exposed toes are not allowed. (Crocs, flip-flops, sandals, or boots pose a safety hazard on the Game Square.)

Note: Parents please ensure that your child is not ill prior to letting them attend Awana Clubs night. We are not staffed or equipped to handle sick children. We will have to contact you to make arrangements to get your sick child home.

 

How can I help my child with his/her handbook?

Each club night children are encouraged to say sections (sets of memory verses) and learn important guidelines for their life. Hiding God’s Word in their heart is the most important exercise we can encourage our children to do. God uses His word to guide us and as parents, grandparents and other adults with specia lrelationships with the Clubbers we can use the time during the week for study and recitation to share personal understanding and insights with our children on a level that is unique to ou relationship with them

 

How can I help support the AWANA ministry?

  • Volunteer to serve. Service is the means to joy and fulfillment in the Christian life. Even occasionally listening to sections will bless you and the workers in your child’s club.
  • Help your child prepare for club.
  • Pray for the Awana Club, for the children and the workers.
  • The children need to be in uniform to complete their sections and receive awards, so help make sure your clubber is in the uniform that corresponds to their age group.
  • Whatever you show an interest in will be come valuable to your children. Learn Scripturea long with your children and God will bless you too!
  • Also remind your children to use the restroom before club and leave gum, candy, and toys a home.

How can I help offset costs?

You can give donations for uniform, books, dues, and supplies scholarships. Scholarships are available for children that need them to purchase uniforms and handbooks or pay dues. The uniform

for Cubbies and Sparks is a vest which costs $8.65 for Cubbies and $9.95 for Sparks. The T&T uniform is a T-Shirt which costs about $12.50. We ask parents to contribute at least $20.00 per club year toward the cost of the uniforms, books, awards, Awana Store, supplies, and snacks. The maximum contribution for families with more than two clubbers will be $40.00 per club year.
Note: All FBCF Awana directors, leaders, leaders-in-training, secretaries, and workers are expected to pay their weekly dues and the cost of their uniform shirts.

 

How do we handle discipline problems in AWANA club?

Discipline is the process of teaching acceptable behavior and self control.
Discipline begins with the opening ceremony (pledges and prayer) and is a part of every aspect of club.
We use the three-count Awana discipline model.
Same club meeting (night)
   1. Verbal Warning about conduct
   2. Leader will talk with clubber about what they did wrong and notify parents or responsible adult as soon as reasonable.
   3. Two leaders wil lescort clubber home or to parents, and discuss child’s behavior. Your child is welcome back again when the ycan behave according to Club rules & expectations. We use lots of positive reinforcement and awards for the progress children make!
Unruly and disruptive clubbers take away from everyone’s experience and cannot be tolerated.

© 2017 First Baptist Church, Fairborn
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